Do We Need Photography And Videography In A School Setting?

They say that children are naturally creative but we try to suppress them because we’re either too lazy to clean after them (when they color our walls with colored pens) or we do not put them in an environment that would enhance that creativity. Using photography and videography as part of school activities and in a classroom setting would help the children enhance their skills in taking videos and photos.

It would make them think outside of the box—rather than write a paper on a concept being taught in the classroom, those who are more “visual,” can use photos and videos to show that they understand the lessons.

We should also create a photography and videography club in schools where children are going to be taught how to properly handle a camera and how to use them in a non-intrusive way. This will help hone the skills of the students, as well as put their extra energy into something that can help them in the future.

Instead of simply spending time with their friends hanging out in malls, cinemas, and coffee shops, they would do better putting all that energy into good use. Who knows? Maybe you will develop the next Steven Spielberg in your class.

But it’s not just the students who will benefit from using photos and videos in a classroom setting. Teachers who are having a hard time communicating and connecting with their students (because of age gap and technology, what else) can also use photography and videography to explain concepts, theories, and put lessons in perspectives that these students will willingly try to comprehend.

Instead of always using the whiteboard and the projector to explain theories and contexts to the students, the instructors would be able to connect better using photos and videos.

And trust us, the students will listen more attentively if presented with visual representations of the things they just hear from their teachers. Everything, apparently, must be turned into visuals these days.

Moreover, the use of photos and videos in classrooms is time- and energy-saving. Instead of droning and on about a theory that you’re explaining, you can just create an engaging video about it and let your students watch it again and again.

You can give them a copy of the video provided that they don’t share it with anyone else outside the classroom. They can revisit the video if there are concepts and ideas that they have forgotten about. This will help jog their memories and make them effective in understanding the concepts explained in the classroom.